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Aphthous Ulcers

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Aphthous Ulcers are small ulcer craters in the lining of the mouth that are frequently painful and sensitive. Aphthous ulcers are very common. About 20% of the populations (one out of five people) have aphthous ulcers at any one time. Aphthous ulcers are usually found on the movable parts of the mouth, such as the tongue or the inside lining of the lips and cheeks, and at the base of the gums. The ulcers begin as small oval or round reddish swellings that usually burst within a day. The ruptured sores are covered by a thin white or yellow membrane…

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Pedi-partial / Bi-lateral Space Maintainer

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A pedi-partial is an alternative to the premature loss of front primary (baby) teeth. Artificial teeth can not be expected to function as natural teeth. A pedi-partial is designed primarily for esthetic reasons; therefore your child will need to avoid hard, sticky foods or biting hard objects. Some Examples of foods to avoid are: Jolly Ranchers, Now & Laters etc… Chewing Gum / Bubble Gum Taffy, Tootsie Rolls, Carmel Gummy Bears Skittles Popcorn Lollipops Pizza Crusts Apple, Pears (Any foods that require biting into need to be cut up in bite size pieces so that no pressure is applied to…

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Post-op Instructions For Extractions

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After an extraction, the main concern is to stop the bleeding from the extraction site. The most effective technique is to have the child bite tightly on a piece of gauze for15 to 30 minutes. If your child is too young or unable to do this, hold the gauze tightly over the site with your clean finger for the same length of time. Even after long pressure the extraction site may bleed slightly for several hours or even stop then start again. The blood will mix with saliva and look much worse than it really is. Further pressure will usually…

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Oral Hygiene of Composites (White Fillings)

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It has been recommended that your child have a composite filling placed. Composite is a white, or tooth colored filling. Composites rely on EXCELLENT oral hygiene (cleanliness of the teeth) for longevity, durability, and esthetics (looks) Plaque build up on these teeth will reduce the success rate of your child’s fillings(s). It will also contribute to secondary decay, risking the survival rate of the tooth by new decay growing closer or into the pulp or nerve of the tooth. Children under the age of six require an adult or parent’s help in proper brushing and flossing habits at home. This…

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Post Op Trauma Sheet

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Care of the Mouth after Trauma Please keep the traumatized area as-clean-as possible. A soft wash cloth often works well during healing to aid the process. Watch for darkening of traumatized teeth. This could be an indication of a dying nerve (pulp). If the swelling should re-occur, our office needs to see the patient as-soon-as possible. Ice should be administered during the first 24 hours to keep the swelling to a minimum. Watch for infection (gum boils) in the area of trauma. If infection is noticed – call the office so the patient can be seen as-soon-as possible. Maintain a…

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Mucocele

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Mucous cysts are common. They are painless but can be bothersome because you are so aware of the bumps in your mouth. The cysts are thought to be caused by sucking the lip membranes between the teeth, or bumping the lip causing blockage of the salivary glands. Mucous cysts are harmless. If left untreated, however, they can organize and form a permanent bump on the inner surface of the lip. They are called ranula when on the floor of the mouth, and epulis when on the gums. A thin, fluid-filled sac appears on the inside of the lip. The sac…

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Post-op Instructions For Space Maintainer

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The Space Maintainer that your child has had placed today is cemented onto the tooth with a dental cement that contains fluoride. This cement takes about 12 hours to achieve its final set. A soft diet for the rest of the day is suggested. Space Maintainers may come off if your child eats sticky candies, chewing gum, lollipops, etc. Please avoid these as long as your child has any Space Maintainers on his/her teeth. It is not unusual for the gum tissue around the Space Maintainer to be red, and or irritated for several days. Salt-water rinses can be used….

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Post-op Instructions For Stainless Steel Crowns

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The Crown that your child has had placed today is cemented onto the tooth with a dental cement that contains fluoride. This cement takes about 12 hours to achieve its final set. A soft diet for the rest of the day is suggested. Crowns may come off if your child eats sticky candies, chewing gum, lollipops, etc. Please avoid these as long as your child has any crowns on his/her teeth. It is not unusual for the gum tissue around the crown to be red, and or irritated for several days. Salt-water rinses can be used. Baby anbesol can be…

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